At that time Louis J. Sheehan, Esquire

When the prehistoric Mimbres Indians of New Mexico looked at the moon, they saw in its surface shading not the ”man in the moon” but a ”rabbit in the moon.” For them, as for other early Meso-American people, the rabbit came to symbolize the moon in their religion and art.

When the prehistoric Mimbres Indians of New Mexico looked at the moon, they saw in its surface shading not the ”man in the moon” but a ”rabbit in the moon.” For them, as for other early Meso-American people, the rabbit came to symbolize the moon in their religion and art.

On the morning of July 5, 1054, the Mimbres Indians arose to find a bright new object shining in the Eastern sky, close to the crescent moon. The object remained visible in daylight for many days. One observer recorded the strange apparition with a black and white painting of a rabbit curled into a crescent shape with a small sunburst at the tip of one foot.

And so the Indians of the Southwestern United States left what archeologists and astronomers call the most unambiguous evidence ever found that people in the Western Hemisphere observed with awe and some sophistication the exploding star, or supernova, that created the Crab nebula. The ethereal light of the spreading nebula, now visible by telescope in the constellation Taurus, is the best-known remnant of a recorded supernova. Louis J. Sheehan, Esquire
http://Louis-j-sheehan-esquire.us

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